San francisco restaurants

These are the restaurants in San Francisco that closed permanently in August

The restaurant and bar industry has been hit hard since shelter-in-place began in March, forcing a number of businesses to close permanently. Here is a list of some notable establishments that closed during the month of August.

Armstrong Brewery

After months of temporary closure, the South San Francisco brewery announced it would not reopen. In a letter written online to customers, Armstrong Brewing thanked its customers and team. “We are sad to announce that we will not be reopening for business and have made the difficult decision to close Armstrong Brewing Co. due to the restriction that COVID has placed on small businesses like ours,” the message read. Read more.

CatHead’s BBQ

CatHead’s barbecue moved to take-out shortly after closing, but months of financial difficulties prompted owners Richard Park and Pam Schafer to close the business on August 2. Things got tough for them after the catering events ended and fewer customers visited their storefront. Read more.

The cremerie

Located around the corner from Kitty 4th and Caltrain’s King station, The Creamery has quickly become a hangout for those in the tech scene, as well as those in the area attending a Giants game. Owner Ivor Bradley closed shop after 12 years at the location, saying the lease had expired and he had made the decision not to renew. Read more.

E’ Tutto Qua

A North Beach favorite of former San Francisco Chronicle food critic Michael Bauer, E’ Tutto Qua has announced it will be closing after 13 years in business. [San Francisco Chronicle]

farallon

After more than 23 years in Union Square, an email sent to employees at the Farallon restaurant said the business was closing permanently.

Dianna H. / Yelp

farallon

After more than 23 years in Union Square, an email sent to employees at the Farallon restaurant on August 19 announced that the business would be closing permanently. The restaurant was known for its sustainable fish dishes and oyster bar, in addition to its whimsical nautical decor that included jellyfish light fixtures and a hand-painted domed ceiling. Read more.


Maurer Park

Salome Buelow, owner of Maurerpark, announced that the German cafe would close permanently on August 14 after indicating that the ongoing pandemic had only made matters worse for her business. “Wish I could keep going, but this industry has always been tough, especially in big, expensive cities like San Francisco,” Buelow wrote. “Covid-19 has only made it even worse.” Read more.

Kitchen Pica Pica Arepa

After 10 years of serving Venezuelan food on Valencia Street, Pica Pica Area Kitchen owner Adriana López Vermut made the difficult decision to permanently close on August 30. López Vermut had run the restaurant with his father at previous locations since 2008, selling their popular arepas to customers. “We dreamed of making Pica Pica Arepa Kitchen a big business with thousands of restaurants across the country and sharing our love for Venezuelan culture and cuisine,” López Vermut wrote in a farewell letter to customers. “We never achieved that goal, but we survived for fourteen years and my four children, and the tens of thousands of people who have eaten our food, understand and appreciate my legacy. So I consider Pica Pica a huge hit.” Read more.

The Prairie No San Francisco restaurant was quicker to reinvent itself in the face of the pandemic than Prairie.  By March 16, the day San Francisco Mayor London Breed issued a shelter-in-place order, the Italian Mission spot had already turned into a general store.  But even pivoting that quickly couldn't save Prairie — on August 14, the restaurant closed for good.

Meadow

No restaurant in San Francisco has been quicker to reinvent itself in the face of the pandemic than Prairie. By March 16, the day San Francisco Mayor London Breed issued a shelter-in-place order, the Italian Mission spot had already turned into a general store. But even pivoting that quickly couldn’t save Prairie — on August 14, the restaurant closed for good.

Amy Graff / SF Gate

Meadow

The Mission’s Italian restaurant quickly turned into a general store selling pantry staples, toilet paper and meal kits on the very first day San Francisco was ordered to shelter in place on the spot. But Prairie’s new business model was never meant to be permanent. Chef and owner Anthony Strong called it quits August 14. Read more.

The Riddler

The popular Hayes Valley champagne bar has announced its permanent closure on August 21. In their farewell message shared on Instagram, the bar said “we were losing more than we could handle”. Read more.

Seal Rock Inn Restaurant

An “unexpected rent increase” has taken place at the Seal Rock Inn restaurant, a longtime brunch favorite, after 46 years, forcing owner Andy Psarras to close the restaurant, Eater reported. Psarras said he attempted to do take-out briefly during the shelter-in-place, but instead decided to temporarily close after 10 days … only to make the decision to close once the rent went up while they were closed. [Eater]

serpentine

Opened in 2007, Serpentine began as a Slow Club partner restaurant in the Mission before being taken over by current owner Tommy Halvorson in 2016 after the Slow Club closed. Halvorson told Eater SF that “even before COVID-19, Serpentine was in huge pain” saying his model “just didn’t work.” [Eater]

Your Kiang

The 42-year-old Richmond dim sum restaurant has announced it will close permanently on August 31, citing difficulties retaining staff and the owner’s desire to retire. “We are sad and sorry that it is time to say zai jian (until we meet again),” read a letter posted outside the restaurant. Read more.

Scroll through the slideshow at the top of the article to see other restaurants that closed this year.

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